Easter treat from the East

Or well, east at least if you’re standing in the Western Europe. If I look back at my childhood and what I remember Easter for it has to be these two things; mämmi and paskha. Mämmi is a Finnish dessert that–how should I say this–doesn’t travel well because of its appearance. (Go ahead, click on the link and you’ll understand)

The second, paskha, traveled well into Finland from Russia back when we used to be part of the empire and get more influences from the Eastern Orthodox church.

Paskha or Pascha is a festal dish made in Eastern Orthodox countries of those foods which are forbidden during the fast of Great Lent. It is made during Holy Week and then brought to church on Great Saturday to be blessed after the Paschal Vigil. The name of the dish comes from Pascha, the Eastern Orthodox celebration of Easter.

Wikipedia

It’s been part of my family’s Easter celebrations for as long as I remember and probably my favourite thing about the season. Of course, as a Finn, I should pick mämmi but try both side by side and tell me this isn’t better.

Without further ado, here’s my mums recipe for paskha.

Paskha

Ingredients

  • 250 g formage frais or quark (try and find the full fat versions of these, really makes a big difference)
  • 70 g butter
  • 70 g sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 75 ml whipping cream
  • 50 g raisins
  • 30 g crushed almonds
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 heaped tablespoon candied orange peel (or mixed peel)

Method

  1. Gently whip the cream for a minute or two. You’re not trying to make whipped cream, just to give a bit more body
  2. In a large bowl, mix all the ingredients together really well
  3. Pour in to a paskha mold (more on this later), cover and place in the fridge for at least 12 hours or over night

Notes

I don’t actually have a paskha mould and wasn’t able to get one for this Easter. I made mine in a coffee filter holder with the filter in the place. If you do this, remember to wet the filter before pouring in your mixture. Traditionally paskha is made in a wooden mould that gives it its distinctive shape (see below). You can of course use anything that’s suitable as a mould. One thing is that excess fluid must be able to strain away so muslin and a hole in the bottom is needed. Maybe try a flower pot? This recipe filled a regular sized coffee filter and there was a little bit extra.

Preparation time: 10 minute(s)

Cooking time: 12 hour(s)

Number of servings (yield): 4