Coarse Pork Liver Patè

We’re back from our holidays and it’s time to get some more recipes up. During our trip, I got started in planning our Christmas meal. Yes, I know, it’s a bit early but we’re hosting it for the first time ever so it’s kind of a big deal. Over the next few months, I’ll be testing out recipes for dishes I’m thinking of offering. You can follow the progress via this tag: The First Christmas. This week, I’ll start with something that’s surprisingly quick and easy to make liver patè.

I’ve made it with port liver, but I’m sure it’ll work just the same with chicken or venison.

Coarse Pork Liver Patè

Relatively easy to make liver patè.

Ingredients

  • 400 g pork liver
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 50 g butter plus some for frying
  • 1 tsb mace
  • 1 tbsp thyme, chopped
  • a few sage leaves, chopped
  • pepper
  • salt

Method

  1. Cut off all the membrane left on the liver
  2. On medium heat, fry the liver and onion in the butter
  3. Add seasoning and herbs
  4. Fry on both sides till the liver is still a little pink inside
  5. Take off heat and let it cool down a bit
  6. Mix in rest of the butter to add moisture
  7. Now, take half of the livers and blend in a small blender until smooth
  8. Blend rest of it only a little bit so that it’s more like a mince
  9. Mix both halves together and pack into ramekins. Try and get rid of as much of the air pockets as possible
  10. Melt a large knob of butter and use it to seal the patè

Preparation time: 10 minute(s)

Cooking time: 30 minute(s)

Number of servings (yield): 12

Stinging Nettle Pancakes with Morel Mushroom Stew


For a long time, I’ve had a love-hate relationship with stinging nettles. Nettles is one of the first plant of the spring you can forage for food. It marks the beginning of the summer as it’s often the first thing in our garden to end up on our plates. Unfortunately, it just keeps growing ever bigger and in larger quantities. It attempts to infiltrate its stingy stems everywhere, between the raspberry bushes, strawberries and any free space you can find in the garden. I’ve been trying to turn my hate for into love by using it’s stems for colouring wool, but the colour only ends up being a bleak greyish-green.

Luckily, nettle pancakes, by themselves or with mushroom stew, are delicious!

Nettle Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 3 litres of small nettle leaves, washed
  • 30 cl plain flour
  • 10 cl barley flour
  • 80 cl milk
  • an egg or two
  • 1/2 tsb salt

Method

  1. Mix the dough until smooth and add finely chopped nettles
  2. Let it sit for an hour
  3. Cook on a hot skillet with butter

Preparation time: 10 minute(s)

Cooking time: 1 hour(s)

Number of servings (yield): 4

Morel Mushroom Stew

Ingredients

  • 200 g morel mushrooms (boiled twice to remove poison)
  • 35 g butter
  • 1/2 onion
  • salt
  • 1 tbsp plain flour
  • 20 cl cream

Method

  1. Fry the mushrooms on a dry frying pan for a moment until excess water has evaporated
  2. Add butter, onion and salt, and fry for a few minutes
  3. Add plain flour and fry a bit more until slightly browned
  4. Finally, add cream and let the stew sit for about 10 minutes until serving.

Preparation time: 1 hour (if using fresh morels)

Cooking time: 20 minutes

Number of servings (yield): 4

Sextet of Cakes

Past weekend we had a naming party for our now 15-week-old boy, Oskari. For the party we decided to make 6 cakes spelling his name. See below for the result. Some of the recipes are already here on Crofton Tales, rest will follow in the next few weeks so stay tuned.

There’s two reasons for going with Gotham as the font. 1) it has a perfectly round capital O and 2) it has plenty of straight edges that are easy to cut. Other matters influencing the choice were that this font saw a lot of use in Obamas campaign posters. Name of the font, Gotham, also reminds us of Batman, the one and only true super hero. Not a bad crowd to be associated with.

Making the letters turned out to be pretty easy. I bought two new silicon bases from Sainsbury’s, one square (21 by 21 cm) and one round (21 cm in diameter). I used the O as size guide and printed templates of the letters on A4 sheets. Then it was just a matter of cutting them out once the cakes had cooled down.

It’s worth a mention that most of the off cuts never made it to the party.

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