Coarse Pork Liver Patè

We’re back from our holidays and it’s time to get some more recipes up. During our trip, I got started in planning our Christmas meal. Yes, I know, it’s a bit early but we’re hosting it for the first time ever so it’s kind of a big deal. Over the next few months, I’ll be testing out recipes for dishes I’m thinking of offering. You can follow the progress via this tag: The First Christmas. This week, I’ll start with something that’s surprisingly quick and easy to make liver patè.

I’ve made it with port liver, but I’m sure it’ll work just the same with chicken or venison.

Coarse Pork Liver Patè

Relatively easy to make liver patè.

Ingredients

  • 400 g pork liver
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 50 g butter plus some for frying
  • 1 tsb mace
  • 1 tbsp thyme, chopped
  • a few sage leaves, chopped
  • pepper
  • salt

Method

  1. Cut off all the membrane left on the liver
  2. On medium heat, fry the liver and onion in the butter
  3. Add seasoning and herbs
  4. Fry on both sides till the liver is still a little pink inside
  5. Take off heat and let it cool down a bit
  6. Mix in rest of the butter to add moisture
  7. Now, take half of the livers and blend in a small blender until smooth
  8. Blend rest of it only a little bit so that it’s more like a mince
  9. Mix both halves together and pack into ramekins. Try and get rid of as much of the air pockets as possible
  10. Melt a large knob of butter and use it to seal the patè

Preparation time: 10 minute(s)

Cooking time: 30 minute(s)

Number of servings (yield): 12

Stinging Nettle Pancakes with Morel Mushroom Stew


For a long time, I’ve had a love-hate relationship with stinging nettles. Nettles is one of the first plant of the spring you can forage for food. It marks the beginning of the summer as it’s often the first thing in our garden to end up on our plates. Unfortunately, it just keeps growing ever bigger and in larger quantities. It attempts to infiltrate its stingy stems everywhere, between the raspberry bushes, strawberries and any free space you can find in the garden. I’ve been trying to turn my hate for into love by using it’s stems for colouring wool, but the colour only ends up being a bleak greyish-green.

Luckily, nettle pancakes, by themselves or with mushroom stew, are delicious!

Nettle Pancakes

Ingredients

  • 3 litres of small nettle leaves, washed
  • 30 cl plain flour
  • 10 cl barley flour
  • 80 cl milk
  • an egg or two
  • 1/2 tsb salt

Method

  1. Mix the dough until smooth and add finely chopped nettles
  2. Let it sit for an hour
  3. Cook on a hot skillet with butter

Preparation time: 10 minute(s)

Cooking time: 1 hour(s)

Number of servings (yield): 4

Morel Mushroom Stew

Ingredients

  • 200 g morel mushrooms (boiled twice to remove poison)
  • 35 g butter
  • 1/2 onion
  • salt
  • 1 tbsp plain flour
  • 20 cl cream

Method

  1. Fry the mushrooms on a dry frying pan for a moment until excess water has evaporated
  2. Add butter, onion and salt, and fry for a few minutes
  3. Add plain flour and fry a bit more until slightly browned
  4. Finally, add cream and let the stew sit for about 10 minutes until serving.

Preparation time: 1 hour (if using fresh morels)

Cooking time: 20 minutes

Number of servings (yield): 4

Rosemary and Thyme Focaccia

Last week, we went for lunch at Benugo in the BFI. I had a very nice veal burger but I couldn’t finish it. Why? Because of the lovely focaccia bread I filled up on before the mains arrived. Shame on me so I decided to make some myself the next day. Here’s what I came up with.

Recipe: Rosemary and Thyme Focaccia

Ingredients

  • 160 ml water
  • 2 tbs (7 g) dry yeast
  • 500 g strong white flour
  • 2 tsb salt
  • 80 ml olive oil (plus extra for coating after baking)
  • 80 ml white wine
  • 2 tbsp chopped rosemary
  • 1 tbsp thyme leaves
  • flaky sea salt

Instructions

  1. Whisk yeast into about 100 ml of the water and let it stand for 5 minutes
  2. Mix the flour and salt in a large bowl, make a well in the middle
  3. Pour yeast/water mix in the well and with a spoon stir it until enough flour is pulled in to form soft paste
  4. Let it stand for 20 minutes, this starts the yeast
  5. Add wine, olive oil and 2/3 of rosemary and thyme, mix until you have a nice sticky dough. Add more water if necessary
  6. Either knead for 10-15 minutes or mix using a food processor with dough hook for 5 minutes. When using a processor, I then finish it by kneading another 3 minutes.
  7. Leave the dough in a large bowl to rise for an hour or until at least doubled in size.
  8. Knock it back and place into a cake tin so it covers the base all the way to the edges. I use one that’s 24 cm in diameter.
  9. Let it prove for about 1 1/2 – 2 hours
  10. Sprinkle the remaining rosemary and thyme on top with some flaky sea salt
  11. Bake in 200°C for 30 minutes
  12. Straight after the bread comes out, sprinkle it with plenty of olive oil and let it cool down.

Preparation time: 30 minute(s)

Cooking time: 30 minute(s)